Quote

"No amount of anxiety makes any difference to anything that is going to happen."

- Alan Watts - How To Melt Anxiety. (via blackened—lungs)

(via tryingtofindthewords)

Source: blackened--lungs
Photo
Quote

"

We begin to find and become ourselves when we notice how we are already found, already truly, entirely, wildly, messily, marvelously who we were born to be. The only problem is that there is also so much other stuff, typically fixations with how people perceive us, how to get more of the things that we think will make us happy, and with keeping our weight down. So the real issue is how do we gently stop being who we aren’t? How do we relieve ourselves of the false fronts of people-pleasing and affectation, the obsessive need for power and security, the backpack of old pain, and the psychic Spanx that keeps us smaller and contained?

Here’s how I became myself: mess, failure, mistakes, disappointments, and extensive reading; limbo, indecision, setbacks, addiction, public embarrassment, and endless conversations with my best women friends; the loss of people without whom I could not live, the loss of pets that left me reeling, dizzying betrayals but much greater loyalty, and overall, choosing as my motto William Blake’s line that we are here to learn to endure the beams of love.

"

- Anne Lammot (via emily—hope)

(via tryingtofindthewords)

Source: emily--hope
Quote

"I always feel incredibly intimidated, so I kind of kick myself in the ass and give myself a pep talk. I’m like, ‘Okay, go in there and say what you mean and mean what you say. And be brave.’"

- Rachel McAdams (via elle-aime-sourire)

(via tryingtofindthewords)

Source: elle-aime-sourire
Quote

"I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers."

- L. M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables (via flyingmind)

(via tryingtofindthewords)

Source: vintageborn
Quote

"I knew I matured when I realized every situation doesn’t need a reaction. Sometimes you just have to leave people to continue to do the lame shit that they do."

-

(via f-reska)

this was taken out of my brain. 

(via aphreodite)

(via istealpens)

Source: theeducatedqueen
Photo
oursweetinspirations:

What matters most important…
More sweet inspirations at http://bit.ly/1qAE6Uf

oursweetinspirations:

What matters most important…

More sweet inspirations at http://bit.ly/1qAE6Uf

Source: bit.ly
Quote

"Someday you may think of marrying. Pick someone who thinks you’re the only person in the room."

- Every Day; (David Levithan)

(via harbouring)

Source: 52hearts
Photo
Photo
oursweetinspirations:

You may never know the results come from your action…
More sweet inspirations at http://bit.ly/1qAE6Uf

oursweetinspirations:

You may never know the results come from your action…

More sweet inspirations at http://bit.ly/1qAE6Uf

Source: bit.ly
Photo
lushxrae:

fresh x modern x neon

lushxrae:

fresh x modern x neon

(via oursweetinspirations)

Source: howlyshit
Quote

"

You hear a lot about fears of heights or spiders or clowns, but down deep, most people are most afraid of this one thing: sounding dumb. New research shows that people shy away from asking for help for fear of appearing less competent, but that this is an unfounded fear: Asking for advice actually makes you seem more capable. Across five studies, a research team led by Harvard Business School’s Alison Wood Brooks finds that people think better of others when they ask for advice — mostly because people really love to give advice. Being asked for advice seems to give us a self-confidence boost, which in turn enhances our opinion of the advice-seeker, Brooks and colleagues write in the paper, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Management Science.

Another study replicated the IM-chat findings, but added a small twist: The participants were also asked to rate their self-confidence at the end of the task. In the advice-seeking condition, people who reported greater self-esteem also rated their partners as more highly competent. The research also showed that people who’d been asked advice were more likely to say that they’d ask their partner for advice in a future task, suggesting that advice-asking has a circular ego-boosting effect.

"

Source: New York Magazine